• Rocky movie breakdown

    December 9, 2013  |  Infographics

    Rocky morphology

    Fathom Information Design watched all six Rocky movies, classified segments into dialogue, training, montages, pre-fight, fight, and credits, and then visualized it. Rocky Morphology is the result.

    It's interesting to see the battle between dialogue, montage and fighting throughout each film. Dialogue beats out training and fighting in the first two Rocky films, but fighting and montage occupy the most time in Rocky III and Rocky IV. Rocky V favors dialogue over fighting — undisputedly slowing its pace next to the previous films. In the final round, Rocky sticks with dialogue over fighting but — "it ain't over 'till it's over" — Rocky delivers one last montage and fight scene to close out the series and complete the Rocky Morphology.

    Needs more montage. Maybe we'll get it in Grudge Match, because as we all know, that has instant classic written all over it.

  • Artist temperaments

    December 6, 2013  |  Infographics

    Artist temperaments

    Just for kicks, Jimmy Chen plotted artists on a subjective arrogance-vs-genius scale. Above is the one for singers.

  • Bourbon family tree

    November 15, 2013  |  Infographics

    Bourbon family tree

    Colin Spoelman for GQ illustrated an educated guess of the bourbon family tree.

    This chart shows the major distilleries operating in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Indiana, grouped horizontally by corporate owner, then subdivided by distillery. Each tree shows the type of whiskey made, and the various expressions of each style of whiskey or mash bill, in the case of bourbons. For instance, Basil Hayden's is a longer-aged version of Old Grand-Dad, and both are made at the Jim Beam Distillery.

    This is important.

  • Why traffic waves and congestion happen

    November 14, 2013  |  Infographics

    Why-traffic-waves-happen

    You're on the freeway, traffic is moving along, and for no apparent reason everyone slows down. And eventually, for no apparent reason, traffic starts back up again. What the what? Lewis Lehe and Matthew Green explain why these waves occur with a couple of interactives.

    The simplest explanation for why traffic waves happen is that drivers have relatively slow reaction times: if the car in front of you suddenly slows down, it’ll likely take you a second or so to hit the brakes. The slower your reaction time, the harder you have to brake to compensate and keep a safe distance. The same goes for the car behind you, which has to brake even harder than you did in order to slow down faster. And so on down the road, in a domino-like effect.

    Hit the brakes in the simulation, and you'll see what happens. Naturally this is a simplified version of traffic conditions and assumes some things about how people drive and react, but you'll get the idea.

    It might remind you of this real world experiment a few years ago.

  • The safest time to drive

    November 8, 2013  |  Infographics

    Safest day to drive

    As we've seen, there are more fatal car crashes during the weekend and summer months, which is some time between May and September in the United States. The Guardian took a different approach to look at road fatalities in Australia.

    The bottom section is your standard bar charts that show an average, but on top are mini-simulations that represent the averages. Small cars move in the background and squares appear on top to at different volumes. I originally thought the cars actually collided with each square, but it looks like they're independent of each other. Nevertheless, an interesting approach.

  • Quarterback streaks

    September 30, 2013  |  Infographics

    Quarterback streaks

    Mike Bostock, Shan Carter, and Kevin Quealy for The New York Times explore quarterback streaks in the National Football League since 1970. The longest streak for each team is highlighted yellow, and you can search for your favorite players either by mousing over streaks or via the dropdown/search menu.

    Be sure to also check out the chart iterations of the interactive. First, a couple of bar graphs in R for a visual summary, and then 17 sketches later, out comes the finished product.

    I'm surprised that many of the longest streaks took place in the 1970s and 1980s. You'd think with today's rules, there'd be more in the latter half of the timespan. Then again, trades and quarterback rotations aren't the same as they were back then either.

  • Science fiction starships, an extensive size comparison

    September 27, 2013  |  Infographics

    Spaceships, size comparison

    A while back we saw a size comparison of random spaceships. That one pales in comparison to this extensive version by Dirk Loechel. It's got ships from Star Wars, Star Trek, EVE, Babylon 5, Starship Troopers, Titan A.E., and oh so much more.

    Be sure to see the full-sized version here. [via Kotaku]

  • Planet and moon resizer

    September 24, 2013  |  Infographics

    Moon resizing

    It can be difficult to imagine the scale of planets and moons, because (1) they're really big and (2) they're far away. From where we are, the stars look pretty small, but in reality, they shiny objects might be several times larger than our own planet. In this straightforward interactive, Brian Lukis shows how planet and moon sizes compare. Simply select between the apparent view and the absolute to see how perspective seemingly changes size.

  • Learn to make animated information graphics

    August 22, 2013  |  Infographics

    Graham Roberts, a graphics and multimedia editor at The New York Times, is teaching an online class on how to make animated information graphics and design storyboards. It's a chance to learn from one of the best. Plus, the first 30 people who use the code "YAUDATA" get 50 percent off, which is a steal.

  • Extensive timelines of slang for genitalia

    August 16, 2013  |  Infographics

    Euphemisms

    The title says it all. Jonathon Green, a slang lexicographer, has two new timelines. The first is an interactive timeline that shows slang for male genitalia going all the way back to the 1300s up to present. Colors and shapes represent different parts.
    Continue Reading

  • A second on the Internet

    August 9, 2013  |  Infographics

    Every second online

    In a straightforward view of online activity, Designly shows the approximate number of tweets, likes, votes, and so forth that happen in one second. There's a lot of stuff going on, as you might guess. The tickers for each activity are a nice touch.

  • Size comparison of everything

    August 8, 2013  |  Infographics

    Size comparison of everything

    If you're like me, you often wonder how big the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man is relative to Godzilla or how Godzilla compares to King Kong. Wonder no more. Sixteen-year-old deviantART user Lexinator117 compared the size of everything. The giant graphic is a mix of fictional characters and objects with a handful of real-life, like the Statue of Liberty and the Mayflower.

  • Internet critique as infographic music video

    July 31, 2013  |  Infographics

    I'm not entirely sure how to interpret this music video from Franz Ferdinand, but I'm taking it as a critique on internet culture, with less-than-meaningful charts playing a part. There are lots of colors, geometric shapes, and pictograms flying around the band, with no information attached. I guess that's about right. [Thanks, @augustjoki]

  • Climbing the income ladder

    July 22, 2013  |  Infographics

    Climbing income ladder

    In a study conducted by researchers at Harvard and UC Berkeley, data shows spatial variations for the chances of rising out of poverty into higher income brackets. The New York Times reports:

    Climbing the income ladder occurs less often in the Southeast and industrial Midwest, the data shows, with the odds notably low in Atlanta, Charlotte, Memphis, Raleigh, Indianapolis, Cincinnati and Columbus. By contrast, some of the highest rates occur in the Northeast, Great Plains and West, including in New York, Boston, Salt Lake City, Pittsburgh, Seattle and large swaths of California and Minnesota.

    "Where you grow up matters," said Nathaniel Hendren, a Harvard economist and one of the study's authors. "There is tremendous variation across the U.S. in the extent to which kids can rise out of poverty."

    Two things. First, the NYT piece is really nice. Graphics and interactives are typically shown separate from the written story, but NYT has been shifting as of late and I'm sure other publications will follow. (Although, as you can see in the credits, eight people made the graphics, and most places don't have such resources yet.) The story is all tied together, so you read and interact in a continuous flow.

    Second, the Harvard/UC Berkeley research group released the data, so you can have a go yourself.

  • Housing price changes

    June 28, 2013  |  Infographics

    Shan Carter and Kevin Quealy for The New York Times updated their housing prices graphic from a couple of years ago.

    Rise and fall of housing prices

    Whereas the original interactive showed price changes from only one point of reference, the updated one lets you shift the point of reference so you can see how prices have shifted in major cities since the date of sale.

    I found myself brushing the slider back and forth just for kicks.

  • Income inequality, real and personal

    June 24, 2013  |  Infographics

    Income lost to top 10

    In a different take on the income inequality issue, the Economic Policy Institute, in collaboration with Periscopic, created Inequality Is.

    The Inequality.is website brings clarity to the national dialogue on wage and income inequality, using interactive tools and videos to tell the story of how we arrived at the state of inequality we find today and what can be done to reverse course and ensure workers get their fair share.

    Inequality is: real, personal, expensive, created, and fixable. These are the categories the interactive takes you through to explain the subject. The first part reminds you of the video we saw on wealth distribution, which showed what people thought was an ideal distribution of wealth, what they thought it was in real life, and then what it actually was. However, in this interactive, you're the one answering, which sort of sets the stage for the rest of the interactive. The goal is to make the data more relatable.

    Be sure to go through the whole piece. It rounds off nicely with a video explanation with public policy professor Robert Reich and ways to shift the inequality in the other direction.

  • Guide to Arrested Development jokes

    May 31, 2013  |  Infographics

    Guide to Arrested Develpment jokes

    In celebration of Arrested Development's return via Netflix, NPR combed through the jokes — obvious and obscure — and set them in a handy interactive guide.

    Arrested Development is back! Because we're obsessed we care about your watching enjoyment, we wrote down all the recurring gags in every episode — including the new season 4 episodes — with special attention to jokes hidden in the background (like Cloudmir vodka) or being foreshadowed (like when Buster lost his hand).

    The three categories of joke are color-coded, where each row represents a joke and a tick represents an occurrence of that joke over four seasons.

    I've only watched a handful of episodes, but I'm tempted to turn on Netflix with this guide in front of me. [Thanks, @onyxfish]

  • Lego venn diagram

    May 29, 2013  |  Infographics

    lego venn diagram

    Profound.

  • Stop motion video: Food you can buy for $5 in different countries

    April 24, 2013  |  Infographics

    This stop motion video from BuzzFeed shows how much food you can buy for $5 USD in different countries. For example, five bucks will get you 7 pounds of rice in the United States and 12 pounds in China. The video is straightforward, but the animation of food appearing and disappearing — or rather, added and taken away — lends well to the context that you wouldn't get from a quick chart.

    The gut instinct seems to be "Hey, we should all move to China." Better follow that up with non-Chinese salaries.

  • Flowchart for movie time travel

    April 23, 2013  |  Infographics

    Time travel flowchart

    Mr. Dalliard provides this handy flowchart to organize time travel movies. And yes, I immediately looked for Back to the Future and backtracked.

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