Charting all the Pokemon

Posted to Statistics  |  Tags: ,  |  Nathan Yau

Pokemon is everywhere these days. I think it’s just something the world really needs right now. I know very little about the universe, but I do like it when people analyze fictional worlds and characters. Joshua Kunst grabbed a data dump about all the Pokemon (seriously, I don’t even know if I’m referring to them/it/thing correctly) and clustered them algorithmically. The t-Distributed Stochastic Neighbor Embedding (t-SNE) algorithm to be specific.


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