How stolen data affects you

Posted to Statistics  |  Tags: , ,  |  Nathan Yau

You typically hear about data breaches in terms of number of records that were hacked. “A million email addresses were stolen” or “hackers ripped off 100,000 passwords.” Does anyone care? After the initial gasp-shock-horror, we move on and everyone forgets until the next time it happens.

However, if a hack affects you in some way, you pay closer attention. That long random string password reminds you every time you log in somewhere.

That’s the idea behind this quiz from the New York Times. Answer a few quick questions. See the potential information bits about you that were stolen in the past couple of years.

It’s a good spin on the record tally, and leads you right in to privacy tips and more information about each hack.

Give it a try.

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