Growth of urban neighborhood Wal-Mart

Posted to Maps  |  Tags: ,  |  Nathan Yau

Maybe you saw the Wal-Mart growth map I made a while back. NPR takes a much closer look at Wal-Mart’s current growth strategy, as the store goes smaller and caters to more urban areas. That means less heads of lettuce and more pre-made salads.

NPR focused on the percentage of three city populations that are near a Wal-Mart:

An NPR analysis found that in 2005, none of Washington’s 600,000 residents were within 1 mile of a Wal-Mart store. Today, almost 13 percent are. Chicago has experienced an even more dramatic transition. In 2005, only one-half of 1 percent of the city’s 2.7 million residents lived within 1 mile of a Wal-Mart. Today, more than 22 percent do. (All estimates are based on 2010 U.S. Census population numbers.)

Yay?

Favorites

Shifting Incomes for American Jobs

For various occupations, the difference between the person who makes the most and the one who makes the least can be significant.

How We Spend Our Money, a Breakdown

We know spending changes when you have more money. Here’s by how much.

Years You Have Left to Live, Probably

The individual data points of life are much less predictable than the average. Here’s a simulation that shows you how much time is left on the clock.

The Changing American Diet

See what we ate on an average day, for the past several decades.