Tracing the paths of humpback whales

Aug 20, 2012

For the past ten years, researchers have been tagging hump back whales in the Gulf of Maine with a temporary tracking device called a D-tag. Whereas old tech only recorded location at the surface, the D-tag records depth and orientation allowing researchers to record feeding and diving patterns, which turns out to be pretty unique for each whale.

Scientists hope to use the data to shift fishing and boating policies in the area. Kelly Slivka for the New York Times reports. Be sure to watch the video with the scientists pointing at their computer screens.

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