Infographic essay on the meaning of life

Posted to Data Art  |  Tags: , ,  |  Nathan Yau

Information video designer Marco Bagni abstracted the meaning of life in his short video, Getting Lost. It doesn’t show real data, placing it in the genre of Chad Hagen’s nonsensical infographics, so this piece by Bagni is interesting not for the information it shows but how he used infographics as a way to express a message: “Getting lost is only way to find your own path.”

[Thanks, Nigel]

2 Comments

  • Some data I’d like to see visualised: Flowing Data readers’ blood pressure changes between 00:08 and 00:10. And I imagine 00:46 to 00:47 will creep into some readers’ nightmares… looming out at them like that from the darkness… ;-)

    Beautiful video though. Nice angle on that old debate about information overload and what it means to be lost in information. I always thought being lost in data as like being in a vat full of treacle: whether its a good thing or a bad thing depends entirely on whether you have a spoon.

  • I’d better look at this infographics in presentation form. This video is like a hallucination ^)

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