Extreme ice time-lapse

Posted to Maps  |  Tags: , ,  |  Nathan Yau

Glaciers are big, slow-moving objects, and it might seem that not much is happening if you stare at one for a while. The Extreme Ice Survey, founded by James Balog in 2007, aims to provide the ice with a “visual voice” using time-lapse photography.

One aspect of EIS is an extensive portfolio of single-frame photos celebrating the beauty–the art and architecture–of ice. The other aspect of EIS is time-lapse photography; currently, 27 cameras are deployed at 18 glaciers in Greenland, Iceland, the Nepalese Himalaya, Alaska and the Rocky Mountains of the U.S. These cameras record changes in the glaciers every half hour, year-round during daylight, yielding approximately 8,000 frames per camera per year. We edit the time-lapse images into stunning videos that reveal how fast climate change is transforming large regions of the planet.

Some of the videos span four years, from 2007 to 2011, and it’s amazing to see the sped-up dynamic of the ice. I like this one, which Balog refers to as the cat’s paw. It looks like a big paw of ice reaching into the ocean.

[via Boing Boing]

Favorites

This is an American Workday, By Occupation

I simulated a day for employed Americans to see when and where they work.

How to Spot Visualization Lies

Many charts don’t tell the truth. This is a simple guide to spotting them.

Years You Have Left to Live, Probably

The individual data points of life are much less predictable than the average. Here’s a simulation that shows you how much time is left on the clock.

Jobs Charted by State and Salary

Jobs and pay can vary a lot depending on where you live, based on 2013 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Here’s an interactive to look.