Easter spending patterns in Spain, animated

Posted to Maps  |  Tags: ,  |  Nathan Yau

The MIT SENSEable City Lab, in partnership with BBVA, visualizes spending in Spain during Easter of 2011. The animation shows the activity of 1.4 million people and 374,220 businesses, over 4 million transactions.

The map is less interesting to me since I'm a non-Spaniard (population density?), but the categorizations and spending volume over time is fun to see. Groceries are shown in blue, gas stations in yellow, fashion in pink, and red in bars and restaurants. During the day, you see people filling up the tank, and then as evening comes, the city centers and coast lights up red.

[via @pkedrosky]


  • Being Spanish, there’s a number of things you can see: the different holiday patterns, the roads from Madrid… Nice! :-)

  • too bad Mint.com stopped doing things that are innovative like this video.
    good to see these trends. Although some of the red color codes are somewhat confusing.

  • Fascinating to watch. Shows a couple of interesting patterns:-

    – the mid afternoon spike in the red graph, is presumably the siesta?
    – it looks as if late night/early morning dining and drinking is restricted to the major cities and the coast – perhaps some ex-pat and tourist influence here?

    It would be very interesting to compare this to other countries like the UK who insist on working through the post-lunch slump :)


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