GeoCommons 2.0, now with more mapping features

Posted to Apps  |  Tags: ,  |  Nathan Yau

GeoCommons, an open repository of data and maps, launched version 2.0 this week, which is more feature-rich and robust than the first. Two of the major updates have to do with the fast-changing data landscape: amount of data and browser technology.

In this new version, you can load tens of thousands of points no problem, whereas in the previous version, the application grew sluggish.

If you’ve used GeoCommons before, you’ll also notice is the change to the workflow for making your maps. It’s now streamlined so that you choose your base map from one of the available popular map providers, upload your data or choose from the repository, and then decide what features you want to show and how you want to show them.

Finally, once you’re satisfied with your map, it’s easy to embed it, as shown below, which maps homes for sale in Seattle, Washington. And of course what’s becoming the norm, GeoCommons now supports both Flash and HTML5, so that you can use the tool and embed your maps for most devices.

There’s lots to to play around with, so give it a try for yourself. Plus, it’s free to use. There’s also an enterprise version, which provides additional functionality for anlaytics and private data storage.

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