Plummeting Infographics from I.O.U.S.A – A Nation in Debt

Posted to Infographics  |  Nathan Yau

I haven't seen I.O.U.S.A. yet, but from the online bonus clips, it looks like it could be a good watch for you infographics junkies. The documentary examines the growing national debt and the consequences it will have on its citizens, so the source material sort of lends itself to plummeting time series charts with dramatic flare.

Here's one showing personal savings rate over time:

Deficits and social security over time:

Debt-to-GDP projections:

A $53 Trillion Federal Financial Hole:

Those are just the bonus clips. I'm sure there are plenty more in the actual documentary.

[Thanks, @samkim]

5 Comments

  • the deficits and social security over time animation is pretty slick.

    judging from the bonus clips this movie looks depressing ;)

  • The only thing missing from that Debt to GDP chart is Al Gore on a hydraulic lift. Maybe you’re not allowed to make a modern documentary without a “hocky-stick” graph…

  • The animator for these sequences, Brian Oakes, is the same person who made crossword grids come to life in director Creedon’s previous film, “Wordplay”. His work throughout this film is just fantastic.

    I saw a rough cut of “I.O.U.S.A.” in March — everybody should go out and catch it now that we’re rolling full steam into election season. Get ready to leave the theater shaking your head and muttering, “We are so pwned…”

  • Jen – ah, thanks for that pointer on brian oakes. i really liked wordplay too.

  • This is truly fantastic work. Brings across the message so clearly.

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