A Chat with The New York Times on Making Data More Engaging

Posted to Design  |  Nathan Yau

Jared Pool had a chat with Andrew (multimedia) and Steve (graphics) at The New York Times. I'm sure you're familiar with their work. They chat about the design process of the interactive pieces on The Times site like the transcript analyzer, the home run chart, and plenty of other specific examples. They also go into a bit about where they get inspiration from (e.g. old Fortune magazines, photographs, advertisements) as well as how they go about creating their more innovative pieces.

Keep in mind it's on the User Interface Engineering blog, so it's mostly focused on, well, the user interaction and design and less on where data comes from, the journalistic process, etc, but still, it's a pretty good listen.

[via Visual Methods]

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