Top 10 FlowingData Posts for 2007

Posted to Site News  |  Nathan Yau

It's been a little over six months since I put up my first FlowingData post about creating effective visualization. Going through the archive, I'm amazed by how much this blog has developed and more importantly, by the people I've found who have many of the same academic interests that I do. For that, I'm extremely grateful.

I'm also pretty impressed with how consistent I've been with the posts, because to be honest, I wasn't sure if I'd be able to keep it up when I first started. Had I known about all of the interesting data visualization work and research going on, I wouldn't have had such sour thoughts. Now I know better, and I hope others are benefiting.

So here we are -- the top 10 most viewed posts for 2007:

  1. Three Designers, a Statistician, and Migration Inflows Data
  2. What is the Best Way to Learn Flash/Actionscript for Data Visualization?
  3. News Flowing Through Moveable Type at The New York Times Building
  4. Visualizar Showcase Officially Opened at Medialab
  5. Yahoo Charts Control Library Now Available
  6. Sharing Personal Data to Push Social Data Analysis
  7. Netflix Prize Dataset Visualization
  8. 100 Reasons You Should Be Interested in, Want to Share, and Get Excited About Data
  9. Bars as an Alternative to Bubble Charts
  10. Use Flare Visualization Toolkit to Build Interactive Viz for the Web

Happy new year! See you in 2008.


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